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alpha30ns
10-27-2009, 01:13 AM
Ok first off i havent been on here for months and months, but im still really impressed with the game and how far its come... but thats not important right now :P what is important is the new mobile i7 processors

so today i was going to buy this laptop
HERE (http://www.shopping.hp.com/webapp/shopping/computer_can_series.do?storeName=computer_store&category=notebooks&a1=Category&v1=High+performance&series_name=HDX16t_series&jumpid=in_R329_prodexp/hhoslp/psg/notebooks/High_performance/HDX16t_series)

but then i saw this
HERE (http://www.shopping.hp.com/webapp/shopping/computer_can_series.do?storeName=computer_store&category=notebooks&a1=Category&v1=High+performance&series_name=dv6tqe_series&jumpid=in_R329_prodexp/hhoslp/psg/notebooks/High_performance/dv6tqe_series)

so now im abit confused about what i want...from what ive heard the i7 is amazing and stuff but the i7 processor is only 1.6 ghz (can go up to 2.8 ghz if conditions are right)...i think... and the other one with the duo processor was at 2.53 (configured)

so basically i want to know which processor you guys would prefer? and for the devs if infact the i7 would be compatible with this game?

(also those might not be the laptops i would be getting i just want to know which processor is better at the moment)

nickson104
10-27-2009, 05:17 AM
Im not too sure whether this is spam or not... it looks like advertisement spam... but then again not... is it a SMART spammer? i thought that didnt exist! :p

Supreme
10-27-2009, 06:24 AM
18 posts, doubt he means it as spam.

Joseph Visscher
10-27-2009, 10:38 AM
It looked like spam to me once i saw it,,, i had my hand on the ban hammer,,, but its not spam, hes asking which laptop is better to buy to play DOF.

alpha30ns I'd go with the higher duel core processor, single cores at 1.7 ghz might be not enough to run dof at good fps at times. I have a duel core AMD 6000+ 3.0 ghz.
Dof is a bit more CPU intensive compared to other RTS games, so if you want to run dof at the highest fps possible, the bigger the CPU the better.

But really, if I had that 900$ to spend on a computer,,, I'd get a tower not a laptop, more powerful.

Henry Martin
10-27-2009, 12:00 PM
I agree with Joseph Visscher. I would not get a single core laptop unless I was just watching movies and checking my email. I would go with the duo core as you will get better performenc out of any program.

Like Joseph Visscher said, I would spend $900 on a desktop as you would get a lot more performance, but if you are on the go then get the duo core hp.

Don't really worry about if you hardware is supported by any game, just worry about if the specs can handle the game. I have a laptop with a quadro 570m which mostly meant for modeling then running games and can run any game that exist (doesn't mean it will run good, I can just run it).

alpha30ns
10-27-2009, 12:55 PM
OMG NO SPAM DONT BAN ME!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! lol

ive just been away for months and months....and wasnt very active when i was here lol

@ Joseph the cpu is operating at 1.6 ghz but when your only running 1 or 2 process it uses all 4 processors to work together to boost the speed up to 2.8 ghz, so say if i was just playing a game and no other programs it would be going up 2.7ish ghz while the duo is at 2.53....?? im just confused on how it would work lol and i dont have the money to buy both and see which ones better haha....also i need the laptop for college or i would proally get a tower.

@krab man, the i7 isnt single core its quad core just the 4 cores can work as one if you need the power, or they can work speratly if you need the multitasking...(i think thats how it goes) lol and i didnt mean supported i meant run it, i wouldnt care if i had to run the game on low graphics i just want it to run :P

Josh Warner
10-27-2009, 03:51 PM
I'm not really sure on what's best for laptops, but generally speaking a high end Dual Core will give you better performance for the cost by far outside of very specific circumstances. If the most CPU intensive thing you'll be doing is gaming - Dual Core by far.

Henry Martin
10-27-2009, 05:38 PM
OMG NO SPAM DONT BAN ME!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! lol

ive just been away for months and months....and wasnt very active when i was here lol

@ Joseph the cpu is operating at 1.6 ghz but when your only running 1 or 2 process it uses all 4 processors to work together to boost the speed up to 2.8 ghz, so say if i was just playing a game and no other programs it would be going up 2.7ish ghz while the duo is at 2.53....?? im just confused on how it would work lol and i dont have the money to buy both and see which ones better haha....also i need the laptop for college or i would proally get a tower.

@krab man, the i7 isnt single core its quad core just the 4 cores can work as one if you need the power, or they can work speratly if you need the multitasking...(i think thats how it goes) lol and i didnt mean supported i meant run it, i wouldnt care if i had to run the game on low graphics i just want it to run :P

LOL, I wasn't paying attention, dah (thanks for the reminder). Yes with either one you choose you will be able to run it. My laptop has core 2 duo 2.0 ghz with quadro 570m 256 mb (equal to 8600m gt) and I can run crysis on medium. I know a lot more about computers than my post let on, lol. I personally would go with the i7 laptop. Some would argue for ex. that a 3 ghz duo core would be better than a 2 or 1.7 ghz quad core. I think that for you to use you laptop longer go with the quad core (i7).

if you aren't doing any heavy programs at college than both would be good for gamimg.

also only can more than one core work as one is if the program allows it. Thats one mistake lots of people make.

I hope my response helps.

Josh Warner
10-27-2009, 06:02 PM
OMG NO SPAM DONT BAN ME!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! lol

ive just been away for months and months....and wasnt very active when i was here lol

@ Joseph the cpu is operating at 1.6 ghz but when your only running 1 or 2 process it uses all 4 processors to work together to boost the speed up to 2.8 ghz, so say if i was just playing a game and no other programs it would be going up 2.7ish ghz while the duo is at 2.53....?? im just confused on how it would work lol and i dont have the money to buy both and see which ones better haha....also i need the laptop for college or i would proally get a tower.

@krab man, the i7 isnt single core its quad core just the 4 cores can work as one if you need the power, or they can work speratly if you need the multitasking...(i think thats how it goes) lol and i didnt mean supported i meant run it, i wouldnt care if i had to run the game on low graphics i just want it to run :P

Oh and one other thing - that 'using two cores for one thing' is very complex and very, very rarely utilized by programs. I don't feel like going through and explaining how it all works if you want to know more look up multithreading. Only certain things will take advantage of the combined processors, and honestly - it's not needed for gaming. One core of a dual to run the game, the other to run everything else. Higher clock speed > more cores, except for single cores, which are terrible.

nickson104
10-28-2009, 05:26 AM
Oh and one other thing - that 'using two cores for one thing' is very complex and very, very rarely utilized by programs. I don't feel like going through and explaining how it all works if you want to know more look up multithreading. Only certain things will take advantage of the combined processors, and honestly - it's not needed for gaming. One core of a dual to run the game, the other to run everything else. Higher clock speed > more cores, except for single cores, which are terrible.

FINE! I'm gonna have to buy a dual-core then! :( My single core is now useless according to your claim! :(
*whispers to processor* "its okay baby... he didnt mean it, the big bad ol' man didnt mean it..."

Chris Harshman
10-28-2009, 08:42 AM
The i7 is a great processor, it you have to choose between it and a duel core go with the i7, and it is not 1.7 Ghz, and even if a program does not support it, you will be buying for the future.

and if you are buying a computer now make sure it is 64 bit, not need to stick with 32 bit any more.

Oh and one other thing - that 'using two cores for one thing' is very complex and very, very rarely utilized by programs. I don't feel like going through and explaining how it all works if you want to know more look up multithreading. Only certain things will take advantage of the combined processors, and honestly - it's not needed for gaming. One core of a dual to run the game, the other to run everything else. Higher clock speed > more cores, except for single cores, which are terrible.

That is a misleading statement, Higher clock speed in not better than more cores, most programs on the market have some to alot of mutlicore support. Cores also d not split up one for games one for everything else.

You should also not get a lapop as your primary gaming machine unless you have to because you preformance will be lower than on a tower.

This is a link for the desktop i7's in case you want to look at those, they are much better than the mobile i7
http://www.intel.com/Consumer/Learn/Desktop/corei7-detail.htm?cid=cim:ggl|core_ca_tci7|f7E273|s

Kaznafein
10-28-2009, 09:00 AM
Ya all the review of the i7 processors have been good I'd go for it. I heard its really good with power mangement and managment of all its cores.

Josh Warner
10-28-2009, 10:40 AM
The i7 is a great processor, it you have to choose between it and a duel core go with the i7, and it is not 1.7 Ghz, and even if a program does not support it, you will be buying for the future.

and if you are buying a computer now make sure it is 64 bit, not need to stick with 32 bit any more.



That is a misleading statement, Higher clock speed in not better than more cores, most programs on the market have some to alot of mutlicore support. Cores also d not split up one for games one for everything else.

You should also not get a lapop as your primary gaming machine unless you have to because you preformance will be lower than on a tower.

This is a link for the desktop i7's in case you want to look at those, they are much better than the mobile i7
http://www.intel.com/Consumer/Learn/Desktop/corei7-detail.htm?cid=cim:ggl|core_ca_tci7|f7E273|s

It depends on the program if he's looking just to gaming - a Dual core will provide better performance unless the game is optimized for multithreading. Most are not yet.

And he needs a laptop for school - depending on if he wants to be able to game anywhere, on top of being able to do schoolwork he needs a laptop. Or it may simply be out of the budget to get 2 systems.

As far as 32 vs 64 bit - it again depends on what you're doing. I prefer 32 bit for gaming, no game needs the extra ram and won't for a couple years, and less compatibility errors. Granted as time goes on compatibility will be less of an issue, but right now there are still problems with older programs. Going forward most games will be designed with 64bit in mind - even so there will still be issues here and there. I'd suggest researching what you want to do, what games you want to play etc. and decide based on that. If everything you want to do/play doesn't have issues with 64 bit, absolutely go 64. Compatibility is the big issue, and 64 bit is superior in almost all cases where there are no compatibility. So really - you need to figure out what you want to do. I play several older games that have a myriad of problems with 64 bit, so it's not worth it for me.

Again it comes down to what you want to do primarily. If you want to do encoding/rendering and other very intensive computing - i7 is superior. A dual core for gaming and below as far as necessary computing power will do better, unless the game is multithreading optimized. Even then, a high end dual core can provide a frame rate for any game now and for several years that will rarely if ever dip below a point that you will be able to see without a frame rate counter. And do it for less.

Chris, you actually can designate what each core is doing to a certain extent. Core Affinity in the task manager, and certain third party software. 'processors' 'set affinity' for gaming I typically leave the second core available just for that.

Chris Harshman
10-28-2009, 12:34 PM
It depends on the program if he's looking just to gaming - a Dual core will provide better performance unless the game is optimized for multithreading. Most are not yet.

And he needs a laptop for school - depending on if he wants to be able to game anywhere, on top of being able to do schoolwork he needs a laptop. Or it may simply be out of the budget to get 2 systems.

As far as 32 vs 64 bit - it again depends on what you're doing. I prefer 32 bit for gaming, no game needs the extra ram and won't for a couple years, and less compatibility errors. Granted as time goes on compatibility will be less of an issue, but right now there are still problems with older programs. Going forward most games will be designed with 64bit in mind - even so there will still be issues here and there. I'd suggest researching what you want to do, what games you want to play etc. and decide based on that. If everything you want to do/play doesn't have issues with 64 bit, absolutely go 64. Compatibility is the big issue, and 64 bit is superior in almost all cases where there are no compatibility. So really - you need to figure out what you want to do. I play several older games that have a myriad of problems with 64 bit, so it's not worth it for me.

Again it comes down to what you want to do primarily. If you want to do encoding/rendering and other very intensive computing - i7 is superior. A dual core for gaming and below as far as necessary computing power will do better, unless the game is multithreading optimized. Even then, a high end dual core can provide a frame rate for any game now and for several years that will rarely if ever dip below a point that you will be able to see without a frame rate counter. And do it for less.

Chris, you actually can designate what each core is doing to a certain extent. Core Affinity in the task manager, and certain third party software. 'processors' 'set affinity' for gaming I typically leave the second core available just for that.

A duel core will never provide better preformace than a quad core, even if the quad core has a slighly lower Ghz speed.

If he needs a laptop then get a laptop, but if he is looking for a gaming rig get a tower.

Well at this stage in the computer market, get 64 bit, you might only put 2-3 GB's of ram into it now, but in one year or 2 would you rather buy a whole new motherboard, processor and new RAM because you did not buy a 64 bit computer, when you could buy the 64 bit now, which does not run that much more in price, if at all depending on were you buy from, put in less RAM, and then upgrade RAM later.

Those two laptops linked, had a price difference of only 100 dollars, and the i7 processor model will out preform the other one, hands down, if you look at the comparsions. A Quad core will make a difference in most modern games which for the most part support mutlicore technology, and most now have support for unlimited or 4 cores, very few games are built with only 2 cores in mind now.

designate what each core is doing to a certain extent Yes you can, but the extent is that most programs that support mutlicores will override this, only windows applications will follow this even 50% of the time.

Josh Warner
10-28-2009, 03:15 PM
A duel core will never provide better preformace than a quad core, even if the quad core has a slighly lower Ghz speed.

If he needs a laptop then get a laptop, but if he is looking for a gaming rig get a tower.

Well at this stage in the computer market, get 64 bit, you might only put 2-3 GB's of ram into it now, but in one year or 2 would you rather buy a whole new motherboard, processor and new RAM because you did not buy a 64 bit computer, when you could buy the 64 bit now, which does not run that much more in price, if at all depending on were you buy from, put in less RAM, and then upgrade RAM later.

Those two laptops linked, had a price difference of only 100 dollars, and the i7 processor model will out preform the other one, hands down, if you look at the comparsions. A Quad core will make a difference in most modern games which for the most part support mutlicore technology, and most now have support for unlimited or 4 cores, very few games are built with only 2 cores in mind now.

designate what each core is doing to a certain extent Yes you can, but the extent is that most programs that support mutlicores will override this, only windows applications will follow this even 50% of the time.

Well, he said he needs a laptop, he might get two instead, who knows that's up to him. Of course towers are better, both for power and for price. If he doesn't need to be able to game wherever, and just needs a laptop for word and surfing - get a cheapo laptop and a decent gaming rig.

There are bench marks of Dual Cores out-classing quads for things that don't utilize multithreading. And costing less. These may have been just before the i7 released though. Any hardware he gets should be 64 compatible, and the OS again I say that's totally preference. I'll be sticking with 32 until I need more than 3.25 gigs of ram. By then compatibility should be a moot issue, hopefully.

I'd rather have a E8500 than an i7 for gaming, bang for your buck there. The E8500 will be fine for everything but the crysis' of the future - on the highest settings, might have to drop AA from 16 or something in a couple years. E8500 is much cheaper, and if you want to upgrade later, that money can spent on that. The newer i7s or maybe an i5 might be a good bet too depending on how long you want to wait to get it. Haven't taken a good look at them yet though.

It's all about what he wants in the end, if he wants to buy this rig soon I'd suggest the e8500 if he wants to game, and the i7 if he wants to render/encode or other really intensive things. The money he saves on the e8500, and still being able to use it for 3-5 years, can be spent towards another mid/high end bang for your buck model rather than going bleeding edge and not ever taxing his CPU. Not for several years will the i7 be fully utilized by games. And by then you'll want to upgrade anyway.

Either will play any game he wants, and it will look great, and won't have framerate lag. Both are great processors, it all depends on what you want from it. I'm still not familiar with specifics for laptops however, keep that in mind.

I would suggest the i7 over e8600 though, e8600 is overpriced. For the cost difference i7 blows it out of the water.

alpha30ns
10-28-2009, 03:58 PM
i just need the laptop because im always on the go and i dont like being stuck in one place, but i might get a tower later on for all the stuff that dosent run as well on a laptop.

but gaming isnt my first priority,... graphic design/3d modeling/ animation/ video editing are my priorities

and no matter what im getting a 64 bit and as much ram as i can get... ive been stuck on 512mb for too long lol

so i think im gonna go with the i7 and see where it goes from there....

one more question ive heard both yes and no answers for this but for laptops can you upgrade the,
Processor?
RAM?
Video Card?

its not a issue for me ive just been curious....

Henry Martin
10-28-2009, 04:25 PM
i just need the laptop because im always on the go and i dont like being stuck in one place, but i might get a tower later on for all the stuff that dosent run as well on a laptop.

but gaming isnt my first priority,... graphic design/3d modeling/ animation/ video editing are my priorities

and no matter what im getting a 64 bit and as much ram as i can get... ive been stuck on 512mb for too long lol

so i think im gonna go with the i7 and see where it goes from there....

one more question ive heard both yes and no answers for this but for laptops can you upgrade the,
Processor?
RAM?
Video Card?

its not a issue for me ive just been curious....

Processor- yes and no. I going to say yes if you know what you are doing.
Ram- yes
Video card- no that is one thing I hate about laptops is you can't upgrade those.

Chris Harshman
10-28-2009, 06:24 PM
i just need the laptop because im always on the go and i dont like being stuck in one place, but i might get a tower later on for all the stuff that dosent run as well on a laptop.

but gaming isnt my first priority,... graphic design/3d modeling/ animation/ video editing are my priorities

and no matter what im getting a 64 bit and as much ram as i can get... ive been stuck on 512mb for too long lol

so i think im gonna go with the i7 and see where it goes from there....

one more question ive heard both yes and no answers for this but for laptops can you upgrade the,
Processor?
RAM?
Video Card?

its not a issue for me ive just been curious....

Processor - No, Because Motherboards and Processors are one of the few parts of a computer than you cannot plug and play very well, espically when upgrading to a hmuch higer version of a different or even the same processor.

Video Card can be upgraded, but it is often not worth it because with ore laptop companies replacing it will void your warntee. It can be done by you or better yet a professional, but it is not easy and will cost alot more than spending a few extra bucks now. As a warning I have perosnally fryed a laptop trying to upgrade a vidoe card, I would not recommend doing this or getting someone to do, it is not worht the risk. The other hard part is you need a certain kind of video card which is not easy to get ahold of unless you can get it from a factory.

RAM, Yes but it is usually limited to 2 slots, sometimes they have more, but not often. Newer laptops that are 64 bit will have more, but most 32 bit are limited to 2 because 4Gb is the max you can put in.

As for priorities, if you want to do those things, I would suggest you definatly get a desktop, because working on a laptop will make those tasks very difficult, and normally you need a better computer than to play the lastest games to do those things, as well as a very large amount of harddrive space.

Definately if you just needed a internet browser and word processor for traveling a laptop is your best choice, but it is not very good for what you are trying to do.


With the price of i7's now in decent computers, there is no limit.

For example, I buy high end stuff my computer 3 years ago was a whooping 3500 CDN, now my friend in the states last week got the higest end i7, 8 GB DDR3, Nvidia 280 GTX, 1 TB of harddrive space, plus a bunch of other features for only 1400 US at Best buy. Which is a really really good price.

@Josh : I would like to see so benchmarks :)

Josh Warner
10-28-2009, 10:37 PM
I found several just googling dual core vs quad core, all the games were give or take 10-15% to either one, both in ranges well above the noticeable difference - for editing/encoding/video editing etc the quad cores showed anywhere from.. 140-190% iirc The few I looked at were before i7 though, I think the i7 overclocked properly should perform equal or better in all respects. Both will play anything at frame rates above levels you'll be able to discern a difference so it's moot in that respect.

For the "graphic design/3d modeling/ animation/ video editing" that he'll be doing, the i7 is indeed superior though. Wasn't clear what he wanted to do before. As is, definitely the i7. I'll still be going e8500 myself for the time being, I only game, no video stuff.

As chris said for upgrading, Ram you'll be able to upgrade it - but you won't be able to get more than two slots for it in most boards, even 64 bit. If you do want more, make sure to check the mobo. Agreed on both points for the video card and processor as far as changing it. By the time you want to upgrade any part - you'll be better off getting a new machine entirely for a laptop.

Also - 512 mb? Good lord that's painful. Upgrade soon, lol.

Chris Harshman
10-28-2009, 11:40 PM
The problem with looking at any benchmarks with that are even 6 months old is that they are outdated, you need to look at what the processors were tested at, how they were tested, was it just some guy posting a blog post about two computers he ran, what was installed on the computer, same hardware, same software? All of these things matter in benchmarks, which really means that unless you have a benchmark from a major company.

Intel, AMD, ATI, Nvidia they are pretty much bias one way or the other.
You will always get a result that you are looking for with blog posts.

Josh Warner
10-29-2009, 02:35 AM
:p no I didn't get it from amateurs or biased sources lol.

Henry Martin
10-29-2009, 07:17 AM
As for priorities, if you want to do those things, I would suggest you definatly get a desktop, because working on a laptop will make those tasks very difficult, and normally you need a better computer than to play the lastest games to do those things, as well as a very large amount of harddrive space.

Definately if you just needed a internet browser and word processor for traveling a laptop is your best choice, but it is not very good for what you are trying to do.

I would disagree on this. I am at a college for game design and I do a lot of model, animation, etc and I use a laptop with good results. My laptop is only 2ghz core 2 duo, 2gb ram, 256mb quadro. I have mudbox and I was able to import high poly models with no lag. With either of the those laptops you would be able to do a lot. I also don't have to much problems with gaming either.

I hope your response is not one of those who upgrade every time you get a hiccup in any program or you don't get 60 fps, lol.

Puppeteer
10-29-2009, 11:34 AM
Agreed, u_have_krabs.
because working on a laptop will make those tasks very difficult...
normally you need a better computer than to play the lastest games to do those things
Clearly you've not got a laptop (albeit a recent one).
as well as a very large amount of harddrive space.
Laptops can have large hard drive capacities. In any case, games don't take up the plethora of space that you're implying.

Chris Harshman
10-29-2009, 03:52 PM
I was not refering to games taking up alot of hardrvie space, I was taking about the modeling, animation and video editing taking up alot of space.

My Laptop is actually top of the line, but it is still 100 times harder than on my desktop. even with a 17.5 inch screen and a wireless mouse. You might be able to load a model and it will work fine, but if you are going to be creating a high poly model with perhaps as many as 100 thoussand polygons (Empire Total War Ships for Example) you are not going to be able be as effective as on a tower.

Henry Martin
10-29-2009, 04:02 PM
I was not refering to games taking up alot of hardrvie space, I was taking about the modeling, animation and video editing taking up alot of space.

My Laptop is actually top of the line, but it is still 100 times harder than on my desktop. even with a 17.5 inch screen and a wireless mouse. You might be able to load a model and it will work fine, but if you are going to be creating a high poly model with perhaps as many as 100 thoussand polygons (Empire Total War Ships for Example) you are not going to be able be as effective as on a tower.

For hdd problems just get a external hdd as that are cheap. I imported a 500 thousand poly model onto my laptop with little lag. It all comes down to specs. if you have good specs for either a laptop or a desktop modeling will be good. desktops will have an advantage, but the way you are talking is that a laptop is useless on any but surfing the web. laptop hardware is only a little less as powerful as there desktop counter parts.

to each his own I guess.

alpha30ns
10-30-2009, 12:25 AM
I was not refering to games taking up alot of hardrvie space, I was taking about the modeling, animation and video editing taking up alot of space.


ok my post was alittle misleading lol, graphic design is my main priority cause thats the main class im taking in college right now, the modeling,animation and video editing are all just hobbies... (i planned on going to a tech school next year and maybe try the game design stuff... buts its all questionable right now, as i have no idea what i want to do or how im going to do it lol)... also the modeling stuff i do isnt anything major so its not going to be high poly count and stuff, i just think its fun messing around on programs and seeing what i can do.

also lol u have krabs said yes to changing the processor and chris said no.....? so.... umm.... ill just go with probably/maybe not....kinda? haha :P

Henry Martin
10-30-2009, 02:08 AM
ok my post was alittle misleading lol, graphic design is my main priority cause thats the main class im taking in college right now, the modeling,animation and video editing are all just hobbies... (i planned on going to a tech school next year and maybe try the game design stuff... buts its all questionable right now, as i have no idea what i want to do or how im going to do it lol)... also the modeling stuff i do isnt anything major so its not going to be high poly count and stuff, i just think its fun messing around on programs and seeing what i can do.

also lol u have krabs said yes to changing the processor and chris said no.....? so.... umm.... ill just go with probably/maybe not....kinda? haha :P

For the processor you can buy those anywhere, look on newegg they sell laptop processor. The laptop graphics card is mainly a no as most companies wont sell you laptop video cards. For changing anything but the ram you would have take apart your whole laptop, voiding the warranty and potentially brake it (even higher if you don't know what you are doing).

Chris Harshman
10-30-2009, 06:03 PM
also lol u have krabs said yes to changing the processor and chris said no.....? so.... umm.... ill just go with probably/maybe not....kinda? haha :P

For the processor you can buy those anywhere, look on newegg they sell laptop processor. The laptop graphics card is mainly a no as most companies wont sell you laptop video cards. For changing anything but the ram you would have take apart your whole laptop, voiding the warranty and potentially brake it (even higher if you don't know what you are doing).

Buying one and replacing one are two completely different things.

First off, unless the new processor can work with your current mother board, which with laptops is not very often, you will need to put in a new mother board as well, which should only be left up to professionals. If you wait 1 or 2 years before upgrading a processor in a laptop and you are buying a new processor you will need a new mother board.

Henry Martin
10-30-2009, 06:59 PM
Buying one and replacing one are two completely different things.

First off, unless the new processor can work with your current mother board, which with laptops is not very often, you will need to put in a new mother board as well, which should only be left up to professionals. If you wait 1 or 2 years before upgrading a processor in a laptop and you are buying a new processor you will need a new mother board.

I know buy one and replacing one is two different things. "what you are describing is the same process you have to go through with replacing a cpu on a desktop"(desktops have the same problem). if you motherboard (desktop or laptop) doesn't support it the cpu won't work. the only difference is you have to almost take apart the whole laptop to replace it (depends on the model).

Chris Harshman
10-30-2009, 07:36 PM
I know buy one and replacing one is two different things. "what you are describing is the same process you have to go through with replacing a cpu on a desktop"(desktops have the same problem). if you motherboard (desktop or laptop) doesn't support it the cpu won't work. the only difference is you have to almost take apart the whole laptop to replace it (depends on the model).

The point still stands, it is hard if not impossible to replace a laptop cpu.

which was his question, his question was not a comparison of differences between replacing cpu's in laptops and desktops.

Henry Martin
10-30-2009, 09:51 PM
The point still stands, it is hard if not impossible to replace a laptop cpu.

which was his question, his question was not a comparison of differences between replacing cpu's in laptops and desktops.

That was my answer earlier. On topic, if this is for college a laptop "WILL" do fine regardless what anyone says, but it all comes down to what you think and want, not what two people disputing over a cpu:) . If this wasn't for college I would agree with chris and say good with a desktop.

Whatever you get don't try and upgrade it youself lol.:D

Chris thanks for participating, this is my first online dispute.LOL:D

alpha30ns
10-31-2009, 02:11 PM
ok so i bought the i7 laptop....$1400 gone in a split second lol..... ugh.....

the reason i was asking about changing the processor is because the processor i got was 1.6 and was 400$ to get 1.73 and i know in like 4 weeks the price is going to drop dramaticly to like 100$ (it always seems to do that) and i thought later on i could get it and upgrade but since im not very technically advanced that option flew out the window... haha

[QUOTE=Joseph Visscher;20260]
alpha30ns I'd go with the higher duel core processor, single cores at 1.7 ghz might be not enough to run dof at good fps at times.[QUOTE]

you should totally let me test it out for you when i get it, then we'll see if its good enough :P